Gregg Fields

Reshaping Economic Policy to End Institutional Corruption - Ending Institutional Corruption

Moderator: Gregg Fields, Senior Copywriter, Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists

Barney Frank, former United States Congressman, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Kim Pernell-Gallagher, PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, Harvard University

Paul Romer, Professor of Economics; Director, The Urbanization Project, Stern School of Business, New York University

Malcolm Salter, James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus, Harvard Business School...

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2014 May 23

Institutional Corruption and the Capital Markets: Financial Benchmark and Currency Manipulation, Enforcement Strategies, and Regulatory Redesign

8:00am to 4:00pm

Location: 

Milstein West, Harvard Law School

In the second of an international series of four major workshops, scholars, practitioners, and regulators explore the divergent enforcement agendas followed in the aftermath of the financial benchmark and broader currency manipulation scandals. The workshop builds on the pioneering work of lab on institutional corruption and the Centre for Law, Markets, and Regulation at UNSW on the dynamics of regulatory policy. It assesses the trajectories of the investigative and enforcement process across multiple markets and fuses detailed empirical analysis with recommendations for policy reform...

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Dodd/Frank on Dodd-Frank: Former Reformers on Their Namesake Law

by Gregg Fields

The clock was ticking, the world was watching, and Washington was elevating in-fighting from standard practice to something of an art form. And yet, in the summer of 2010 the mammoth Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was passed, a reaction to the crippling financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing Great Recession. President Obama quickly signed it into law. Could such an ambitious law get passed today? Emphatically no, according to the men for whom Dodd-Frank is named.... Read more about Dodd/Frank on Dodd-Frank: Former Reformers on Their Namesake Law

Gregg Fields and Malcolm Salter — Breaking the Curse: What To Do about Institutional Corruption in the Private Sector

The February 19, 2014, Lab seminar was led by Edmond J. Safra Lab Fellow, Gregg Fields, and Senior Faculty Associate and Harvard Business School Professor Emeritus of Business Administration, Malcolm Salter. Titled, "Breaking the Curse: What to do about Institutional Corruption in the Private Sector," the presentation probed underlying...

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Gregg Fields — After the Fall: How Institutional Corruption Thwarts Post-Crisis Financial Reform

The December 5, 2012, Lab seminar was led by Edmond J. Safra Lab Fellow and financial journalist, Gregg Fields. During his fellowship, Gregg will examine how the growing axis of interdependence between Wall Street and Washington blunts the efficacy of regulatory institutions. For the Lab seminar, Gregg presented a case study examining the implications that financial deregulation, particularly of credit-default swaps, and subprime-lending practices had on the Miami real...

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Mr. Connaughton Goes to Washington: An Inside View of D.C.'s Institutional Corruption

by Gregg Fields

Whether it’s the gilded executive suites of Wall Street or Washington’s lobbyist-lined K Street, it’s all about the numbers—and that’s the problem, according to Jeff Connaughton, an eyewitness, from several vantage points, of the interplay between capital and the Capitol.

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