Christopher Robertson

Christopher Robertson - Remedies for Institutional Corruption: Disclosures, Blinding, and Criminal Prosecution

The first Lab seminar of the 2015 spring semester was presented by Edmond J. Safra Lab Fellow, Christopher Robertson. Christopher Robertson is an Associate Professor at the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona and an affiliated faculty member at the Petrie Flom Center at Harvard Law School. Robertson’s research focuses on how the law can improve decisions by individuals and institutions attending to informational limits, conflicting interests, and cognitive biases. For his Lab presentation, Robertson discussed his project titled, “535 Felons: An Empirical...

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Can Proportionality Distinguish Quid Pro Quo Corruption?

by Christopher Robertson

Kudos to Maggie McKinley, Climenko Fellow and former Lab Fellow, and to Network Fellow Thomas Groll for an impressive blogpost. They argue in a mixed-methods design—drawing on both qualitative data and formal analysis—that much of what lobbyists do isn't really quid pro quo corruption, notwithstanding the appearances.... Read more about Can Proportionality Distinguish Quid Pro Quo Corruption?

Christopher Robertson — Blinding as a Solution to Institutional Corruption

The April 10, 2013 Lab seminar was presented by Christopher Robertson, Associate Professor of Law at The University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law and Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics Lab affiliate. Conducted in conjunction with Aaron Kesselheim, Dan Durand, and Jim Greiner, Professor Robertson's Lab project explores blinding as a solution to institutional corruption through two projects: a multidisciplinary symposium on the concept of blinding...

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Should We Trust the New Cholesterol Guidelines?

by Christopher Robertson, re-blogged from the Petrie-Flom Center

The new American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology guidelines on how patients should manage their cholesterol are likely to dramatically increase the sales of statins. (E.g., check out the bump to Pfizer’s stock price.) Yet, the new guidelines have become instantly controversial, with prominent cardiologists calling them into doubt.

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