Gili Kliger

Gili Kliger

Kliger portrait
Gili Kliger is a PhD candidate in History. Her research interests and publications span topics in the history of modern social and political thought. Her dissertation tracks the emergence of the discipline of anthropology, and its influence on the history of European philosophy. In particular, it argues that late nineteenth-century studies of indigenous culture fundamentally challenged assumptions about what constituted the individual. No longer master of its own reason or passions, the individual—as discerned in myths and masks, drawings and tools, kinship charts and objects of worship—became something new: Anthropology had revealed the complexity of forces shaping individual thought and action. The consequences of this finding were to unfold across the following decades, informing the way continental thinkers recast notions of power, autonomy, and moral obligation. Situating European thought within its global context, the dissertation uncovers profound but neglected links between colonial science, missionary evangelism, and twentieth-century intellectual history. Kliger holds an AB from Brown University and an MPhil from the University of Cambridge.  

Current Role

Graduate Fellows